Here at The Garden Style Company, we’ve got a brilliant range of planters in all sorts of shapes and sizes.

We’ve also got some beast-sized planters so today, we thought we’d have a look at the best of the BIG plants for our mighty planters.

Architectural plants come in all sorts of weird and wonderful shapes and sizes. Some work best indoors, and some prefer life outdoors. Big plants look great when they frame your front door, line the edge of a garden path, or even arranged to give your decking a little privacy from prying neighbours.

Preparation
Choose one of our brilliant planters – made of high quality materials, they’re long lasting and suitable for all weather. They come with pre-drilled drainage holes and a liner so they take all the hard work out of gardening. Investing in a large architectural plant can involve lots of cash – make sure your plant ends up in a quality planter that will last for years to come and not need to be replaced after a year or two. Try our ginormous 179 litre Collectors Planter for a gorgeous and stylish container.

Fill the bottom of your planter with large gravel or a layer of broken pots to assist drainage. Any kind of container gardening needs to work hard to ensure plants don’t become water-logged. Next, fill your planter about two-thirds up with a good quality, peat-free compost mixed in with a good handful of perlite to aid drainage even more. Now is a good time to either water your plant, or stand it in a small amount of water just to loosen up the existing compost and make transferring it a little easier.

We’ve got three fab suggestions for giant plants suitable for the British climate:

Cordyline Australis has become synonymous with coastal living and looks chic in the city at the same time. They can grow very wide (up to 10 metres), and very tall up to about 4 metres. Depending on which variety you go for, Cordylines can live well outdoors, but as others are very tender, it pays to always check the label before you think about positioning.



Phormium Tenax
, otherwise known as New Zealand Flax, are evergreen perennials that are generally pretty hardy. They can grow up to 4 metres high and have a maximum spread of 2.5 metres. These plants are slightly easier to look after than the majestic Cordyline.



Fatsia Japonica
, sometimes known as Japanese Aralia, make a striking addition to any garden. Evergreen and hardy, these beautiful plants have a maximum height of 4 metres and the same potential spread. We’ve got some here in the Garden Style Company garden and can vouch for them surviving a very long, wet, and cold winter.


Of course, one of the problems with BIG plants in BIG planters, is that they are VERY heavy.

Why not make life easier for yourself by ordering one of our brilliant and nifty pot trolleys? We’ve got trolleys in all sorts of designs suitable for indoors and outdoors. Save your back and keep your garden looking spic and span all at the same time.